General Lees Immortals

General Lee’s Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865
Michael Hardy

Two decades after the end of the Civil War, former Confederate officer Riddick Gatlin bewailed the lack of a history of the famous Branch-Lane Brigade, within which he had served. “Who has ever written a line to tell of the sacrifices, the suffering and the ending of these more than immortal men?” he said. “Why has the history of that brigade not been written?” With the publication of General Lee’s Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865, Gatlin’s long wait is finally over.

This storied brigade, first led by Lawrence Branch until his death at Sharpsburg, and then James H. Lane, served with Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia during its entire existence. The names emblazoned on its battle flag read like a history of that army, beginning with the Seven Days’ Battles and ending with the final roll call at Appomattox. Originally part of A.P. Hill’s famous “Light” Division, the Branch-Lane Brigade earned spectacular plaudits for its disciplined defense, hard-hitting attacks, and incredible marching abilities. Its constant position at the front, however, resulted in devastating losses, so that its roll call of casualties by the end of the war far exceeded its number of survivors.

In this deeply researched work we witness the experiences of North Carolina’s Branch-Lane Brigade in nearly every major battle fought in the east, including that infamous day at Chancellorsville when its members mistakenly shot Stonewall Jackson. Two months later they were in Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg, and thereafter throughout the titanic battles of 1864. In the meantime we learn of the camp-life and the hard winters of Lee’s army. Yet when Lee finally surrendered at Appomattox it was the Branch-Lane Brigade still with him, no longer victors but yet unbowed.

Michael Hardy’s General Lee’s Immortals is the first comprehensive history of the Branch-Lane Brigade, and fully meets Captain Gatlin’s challenge by setting forth the complete story of these “more than immortal men.” His study is based on many years of study and grounded on a vast foundation of sources that relate every aspect of the career of this remarkable fighting command. Once finished, every reader will come to think he has met, marched with, fought beside, and bled with these North Carolinians.

Confederaphobia: An American Epidemic

Confederaphobia: An American Epidemic
Paul C. Graham

For 150 years Confederate monuments and other memorials dotted the American landscape. Few people objected. After all, a third of the American people are descended from Confederate soldiers and Congress has officially and legally declared Confederates to be “American veterans.” That time has passed. There is an epidemic of hate and fear sweeping the land; a wave of hostility and intolerance that shows no sign of slowing or stopping; its fury is directed at Southern symbols—flags, monuments, and other displays—in fact everything Southern now appears to be a target. Paul C. Graham has courageously examined this case of mass hysteria; a condition he has aptly dubbed “Confederaphobia.” “It’s one thing,” writes Graham, “to acknowledge that the meaning of symbols is one of perspective. It’s quite another thing to have the meaning dictated by ideologues who are not participants in the cultural tradition . . . . Southern symbols mean to the Southerner exactly what they say that they do . . .speak for those people for whom Southern identity is a living reality.” Southern people are growing weary of the ongoing demonization; of being bullied and harassed; and have begun to realize that Confederaphobia is not a matter of monuments, but a campaign to expunge their identity. If you are a self-identified Southerner, you are a potential target! It’s not too late to inoculate yourself from the dangerous effects of this disease, but this is only possible if you recognize the problem. The problem is not Confederate flags, monuments, markers, belt-buckles, stickers, do-dads, knick-knacks, what-nots, or Dukes of Hazzard re-runs—the problem is Confederaphobia!

Dixie Rising

Dixie Rising: Rules for Rebels
James Ronald Kenedy (Author), Walter Donald Kennedy (Foreward)

Since the publication of their bestseller classic THE SOUTH WAS RIGHT! in 1994, the brothers James Ronald Kennedy and Walter Donald Kennedy have been recognized spokesmen for the South. By the South they do not mean a political position or a collection of quaint attitudes. Southerners are a people—and as a people have a right to be governed by their free consent. But “at no time since Appomattox have the freedom, the heritage, and the culture of the South been under greater attack.” The Southern people are in a struggle for their existence as a people. If things continue as they have been, we will lose. In DIXIE RISING: RULES FOR REBELS the Kennedys propose nothing less than a radical change of approach to the struggle—an approach that discards the losing game of conventional politics. This book is a field manual for what they call “irregular political warfare.” DIXIE RISING provides the tools by which activists can change the current situation and move towards restoring the original Constitutional federal union of self-governing States that our forefathers established. If such a program succeeds, it will be a boon not only to Southerners but to all freedom-loving Americans.
The Yankee Problem

The Yankee Problem: An American Dilemma
Lee W. Sherrill, Jr.

Granny Clampett, on the TV sitcom The Beverly Hillbillies, described the War Between the States as “when the Yankees invaded America” and, indeed, it was! Their invasion of America, however, goes back much farther than the conflict of 1861-1865. It began as soon as they dropped their anchor in Plymouth Bay. Since that time, they have meddled, cheated, and lied their way into every nook and cranny of American life. The Southern people warned others about the radical utopians of New England, and even went to war to get away from them, but to no avail. Now all Americans, not just Southerners, are subject to the whims of “those people” and their never ending mission to recreate, not only America, but the entire world in their bizarre, sanctimonious image. Dr. Clyde Wilson, in this first installment of The Wilson Files, takes the Yankee problem head-on. After decades of historical research and personal observation, he exposes and explains these pesky purveyors of mischief and mayhem! If you want to understand America, American History, and the upside-down dystopian nightmare in which we all live, you have to understand the problem. We do not have an economic problem, a race problem, a class problem, a gender problem, a toilet access problem, a drug problem, a gun problem, or any other ideological or social problem at the root of America’s dysfunctional anti-culture – we have a Yankee problem!
Guilford County and the Civil War

Guilford County and the Civil War
Carol Moore

Guilford County residents felt the brutal impact of the Civil War on both the homefront and the battlefield. From the plight of antislavery Quakers to the strength of women, the county was awash in political turmoil. Intriguing abolitionists, fire-breathing secessionists, peacemakers, valiant soldiers and carpetbaggers are some of the figures who contributed to the chaotic time. General Joseph E. Johnston's parole of the Army of Tennessee at Greensboro, as well as the birth of a free black community following the Confederate defeat, brought amazing changes. Local author and historian Carol Moore traces the romantic days in the lead-up to war, the horrors of war itself and the decades of aftermath that followed.

Carol Moore will present a discussion on her latest book at Barnes & Noble (Friendly Center, 3102 Northline Avenue, Greensboro, NC 27408) on Thursday, July 9, at 7:00 PM.

The 21st North Carolina Infantry

The 21st North Carolina Infantry: A Civil War History, with a Roster of Officers
Lee W. Sherrill, Jr.

The 21st North Carolina Troops (11th North Carolina Volunteers) was one of only two Tar Heel Confederate regiments that in 1865 could boast “From Manassas to Appomattox.” The 21st was the only North Carolina regiment with Stonewall Jackson during his 1862 Valley Campaign and remained with the same division throughout the war. It participated in every major battle fought by the Army of Northern Virginia except the 1864 Overland Campaign, when General Lee sent it to fight its own intense battles near New Bern and Plymouth.

This book is written from the perspective of the 1,942 men who served in the regiment and is filled with anecdotal material gleaned from more than 700 letters and memoirs. In several cases it sheds new light on accepted but often incorrect interpretations of events. Names such as Lee, Jackson, Hoke, Trimble, Hill, Early, Ramseur and Gordon charge through the pages as the Carolina regiment gains a name for itself. Suffering a 50 percent casualty rate over the four years, only 67 of the 920 young men and boys who began the war surrendered to Grant at its end.

GuilfordUnderTheStarsAndBars

Guilford Under the Stars and Bars
C. Michael Briggs

Guilford County's role in the War for Southern Independence 1861-1865, with an introduction by William J. Moore.

Includes a driving tour of Guilford County's 24 Civil War historical sites.

"Michael Briggs' book Guilford Under the Stars and Bars is a great addition to the local history of Guilford County, NC. I think he has exhausted all of the known primary and secondary sources about what happened in the county during the War Between the States. He has created a brand new book that should be read by anyone interested in how the citizens of Greensboro, High Point and surrounding communities played roles in the end of the war. As a bonus, he tells us about the gun manufacturers in the county dating back to pre-Colonial days. There's something in this book for everyone; Guilford County residents, local historians, relic hunters, and history buffs interested in tracking the facinating history of the end of the war." - Clint Johnson (Civil War writer)

TheConfederateSurrenderAtGreensboro

The Confederate Surrender at Greensboro
Robert M. Dunkerly

Drawing upon more than 200 eyewitness accounts, this work chonicles the largest troop surrender of the Civil War, at Greensboro—one of the most confusing, frustrating and tension-filled events of the war. Long overshadowed by Appomattox, this event was equally important in ending the war, and is much more representative of how most Americans in 1865 experienced the conflict's end.

The book includes a timeline, organizational charts, an order of battle, maps and illustrations. It also uses many unpublished accounts and provides information on Confederate campsites that have been lost to development and neglect.

Robert M. Dunkerly, a park ranger at Richmond National Battlefield Park, is an historian, author and speaker involved in historic preservcation and research.

EmpireOfTheOwls

Empire of the Owls
H.V. Traywick Jr.

In the middle of the nineteenth century steam power replaced muscle power as the prime mover of civilization, and the Industrial Revolution roared across the world. A new World-Cycle, the Machine Age, was born. But in the Southern United States men took up arms against the imperatives of the machine, and their Lost Cause marked the end of the Age of Agriculture.

By the editing of contemporary diaries, letters, essays, newspaper editorials, memoirs, histories and official records, and the collation of them into a narrative form, this work offers a contemporaneous portrait of the old Republic, the Old South, the storm-tossed Confederacy, and the revolution that swept it all away, transforming an agrarian Union into an industrial Empire.

GeorgiaRemembersGettysburg

Georgia Remembers Gettysburg: A Collection of First-Hand Accounts Written by Georgia Soldiers
Keith Jones

During the Gettysburg Campaign, troops from Georgia formed a sizable portion of General Robert E. Lee's famed Army of Northern Virginia. From the first crossing of the Potomac River to the bravery and sacrifice exhibited in heavy fighting on July 1 and 2, and ultimately through the agonizing retreat back to Virginia, Georgians played a key role at every stage of the campaign. This collection of accounts written during and after the war by Georgia soldiers provides a unique view into the Gettysburg Campaign from the perspective of those who were in the ranks over the course of those momentous days in the Summer of 1863.

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